NewPSTFormat – 2GB PST/OST Restrictions

Posted on August 22, 2010

When upgrading from Outlook 2003 to Outlook 2007 or 2010, the existing mailbox type may default to non-unicode PST/OST which will confine you to a maximum 2GB mailbox. Starting with Outlook 2007 and now Outlook 2010, a new UNICODE pst/ost format was released to allow for larger mailboxes.

To check the format on your current PST/OST:

1) Load the control panel and double-click "Mail (32-bit)"
2) Load the settings for your current PST/OST and click the "Advanced" tab
3) Near the bottom under "Mailbox Mode" you will see the type.

Unfortunately you cannot convert a non-unicode to unicode on the fly.
Ensure you backup the contents of your PST or OST file to a unique location before proceeding!!

1) Delete your current mail profile from Microsoft Outlook (use the same Mail-32 app in the control panel to do so)
2) Click Start, click run, type regedit and then click OK.
3) Locate and then click the following registry subkey:

Outlook 2007:
HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Office\12.0\Outlook

Outlook 2010:
HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Office\14.0\Outlook

5) Double-click NewPSTFormat.
6) In the Value data box, type the value, and then click OK.

Available Options:

* 0 - Default Unicode

If you set the NewPSTFormat registry value to 0, Outlook 2007 uses the Default Unicode setting. You can use the Default Unicode setting if you want to connect a Windows SharePoint Services list to Outlook 2007.

* 1 - Default ANSI

If you set the NewPSTFormat registry value to 1, Outlook 2007 uses the Default ANSI setting. This setting does not prevent Outlook 2007 from creating a .pst file in Unicode format for a Windows SharePoint Services list. When you add a Windows SharePoint Services list to Outlook 2007, Outlook 2007 automatically creates the .pst file in Unicode format to store the list information.

* 2 - Enforce Unicode creation (THIS SETTING IS RECOMMENDED)

If you set the NewPSTFormat registry value to 2, Outlook 2007 creates Unicode pst files for any automatically created pst file (for example, a SharePoint pst). If you manually create a new pst file, you can only create Unicode pst files because the ANSI pst option is disabled. If you have an existing ANSI pst file, it can be used with your Outlook profile.

* 3 - Enforce ANSI creation

If you set the NewPSTFormat registry value to 3, Outlook uses the Enforce ANSI creation setting. Using this setting prevents Outlook 2007 from creating a .pst file in Unicode format. You cannot use the Enforce ANSI creation setting if you want to connect a Windows SharePoint Services list to Outlook 2007.

7) Click Exit on File menu to exit Registry Editor.
8) Open Microsoft Outlook and re-create youre mail profile
9) Return to the start of this document and check what the format your newly created PST or OST.
10) If you confirm Unicode and you are NOT connected to an Exchange Server, import your backed up PST contents.

Your PST or OST file should utilize the new unicode format and grow past 2GB.

Geo-tagging Dangers

Posted on August 22, 2010

With the release of several recent PDA devices like the iPhone, Blackberry, and HTC, I feel it necessary to educate you on a feature called “Geotagging” which can potentially give your GPS location away. Geotagging is a location technology which stores latitude and longitude data to a picture. In simpler terms, when you take a picture, the location is attached to the photo.

This technology has many great advantages for traveling, location awareness and even theft recovery on stolen property. This article however is meant to address the more serious privacy concerns; If used incorrectly, you could potentially invite unwelcome situations to your daily lives.

Let me give you a few examples:

  • Posting or emailing a picture of your fantastic entertainment system  or new 60inch LCD could potentially include enough information to acquire your home address.
  • Posting or emailing a picture on dating or chatting sites which do not strip the meta data could potentially release your home address.
  • Sending a picture through chat programs which do not strip the meta data could potentially release your home address

There are quite a few more serious reasons including internet predators.
I think you get the idea.

If you have an new GPS enabled device that includes a camera, make sure to read the manual carefully and research it properly before sending or posting pictures online. This technology should be disabled if you do not want your location posted.